Blogathons

Star studded disaster: Airport (1970)

I cannot recall the first time I watched Airport. But I know that it was a very, very long time ago, and that I absolutely loved every moment of it, from the incongruously brilliant casting of Dean Martin as an airline pilot, the heavy banged beauty of Jaqueline Bisset, to the stowaway with a heart… Continue reading Star studded disaster: Airport (1970)

Blogathons, Period Dramas, Uncategorized

Passion and Perseverance: Sense and Sensibility (1995)

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that Jane Austen is one of the greatest, and most influential, authors to ever live. Her six completed novels have been translated into about thirty five languages, and Pride and Prejudice alone has sold some 20 million copies. In addition to being one of the best selling authors of… Continue reading Passion and Perseverance: Sense and Sensibility (1995)

Blogathons, Uncategorized

Why Titanic Isn’t Actually Terrible

Almost immediately after its 1997 release, it became fashionable to dislike, criticise or “hate on” Titanic. This isn’t something specific to this juggernaut historical blockbuster. The trend of massively commercially successful movies that also garner critical acclaim in spite of their commercial success, stretches pretty far back, and there are ample examples. But Titanic is… Continue reading Why Titanic Isn’t Actually Terrible

Blogathons, Uncategorized

Black Panther: Timothy Dalton in Charlie’s Angels

Ah Charlie’s Angels. The epitome of what was termed “jiggle TV” in the late 70s and early 80s. I think you can understand why it was given that rather dubious term if you think hard enough. But in my opinion, and for many women who watched the film at the time of its airing, it… Continue reading Black Panther: Timothy Dalton in Charlie’s Angels

Blogathons

Jane, Jane: Timothy Dalton in Jane Eyre (1983)

The Brontë Sisters are incredibly famous. I don’t think this point can be overstated. Their contribution to the English literary canon, especially Gothic literature, has influenced countless authors, filmmakers and musicians (I’m looking at you, Kate Bush.) They revolutionised a genre that had been seen as low brow, melodramatic trash for almost a century, and… Continue reading Jane, Jane: Timothy Dalton in Jane Eyre (1983)

Uncategorized

The Man Who Loved the Lady with the Lamp: Timothy Dalton in “Florence Nightingale” (1985)

Okay so Florence Nightingale is probably the most famous nurse to ever live, with good reason, as she pretty much revolutionised the field by introducing sanitation measures (seriously, wash your hands) in hospitals, and establishing the first secular nursing school in the world. A famous lithograph of Nightingale from a painting by Henrietta Rae. So,… Continue reading The Man Who Loved the Lady with the Lamp: Timothy Dalton in “Florence Nightingale” (1985)

Blogathons, Classic Film Discoveries, Uncategorized

A Grump With A Heart of Gold: Lionel Barrymore as Dr Gillespie

The Dr Kildare movies only came on my radar fairly recently, as I was more familiar with the Richard Chamberlain series than with the nine films that starred Lew Ayres as the titular Dr Kildare and Lionel Barrymore as his cynical, but secretly caring, mentor, Dr Gillespie. Dr Kildare is a young doctor who wants… Continue reading A Grump With A Heart of Gold: Lionel Barrymore as Dr Gillespie

Blogathons, Classic Film Discoveries, Joan Crawford, Uncategorized

The Working Man: Spencer Tracy in “Mannequin” (1937)

The year that Mannequin had its nationwide release, Joan Crawford was featured on the list of actresses termed as "Box Office Poison". It was a list that featured Katherine Hepburn, Kay Francis, Norma Shearer and John Barrymore, to name but a few. It was a list that is now largely seen as being inaccurate, or… Continue reading The Working Man: Spencer Tracy in “Mannequin” (1937)

Blogathons, Classic Film Discoveries, Period Dramas, Uncategorized

The Last Romanov: Anastasia (1956)

The story of Anastasia, the supposed last living member of the Russian royal family, is famous the world over. The hope that one last symbol of pre-Communist Russia exists/existed, is one that has lived on in the collective imagination for a long time. Twentieth Century Fox made the film twice, once in 1956 and again… Continue reading The Last Romanov: Anastasia (1956)

Blogathons, Classic Film Discoveries, Uncategorized

Love and Medicine (Not Necessarily in that Order): Olivia de Havilland in “Not As A Stranger” (1955)

Olivia de Havilland has been in some of the most iconic films of all time, from Gone With The Wind, to The Snake Pit and The Heiress. But in 1955 she starred in a film that despite having an almost all star cast, including Robert Mitchum, Frank Sinatra, Broderick Crawford, Charles Bickford and Gloria Grahame,… Continue reading Love and Medicine (Not Necessarily in that Order): Olivia de Havilland in “Not As A Stranger” (1955)